I just got Bob Dylan. Last page

  • the ezyrider wrote on 4 Jun '06, 16:28 report
    For so long I had trouble getting into Bob. I bought those 'essential' albums you read in magazines cause I wanted to see what the dealio was and try and learn something.

    Usually I gave up after a couple of listens cause I found the performances a bit too hard to handle, but now I get it. Blonde on Blone just made sense, and Highway 61 Revisited and Bring It All Back Home are just wonderful too. I used to think maybe it didn't hold up for me cause I didn't grow up in the 60's but the songs really are excellent.

    I just needed to share that.
  • outlawheart wrote on 4 Jun '06, 17:33 report
    Bob Dylan is great.
  • the_new_imorality wrote on 4 Jun '06, 17:34 report
    I have that essential album as well. It was like, 10 bucks. It's educational.
  • the ezyrider wrote on 4 Jun '06, 17:55 report
    I think the compilation ruined it for me in the first place. I like the complete album better. The songs all fit together just nice.
  • scotty.g wrote on 4 Jun '06, 18:37 report
    Yeah, I have just been downloading some of his albums because "best ofs" had put me off, but now I too see the light.
  • harto wrote on 4 Jun '06, 18:46 report
    HOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOWWWWW does it FEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEELL
  • hehehehahaha wrote on 4 Jun '06, 19:37 report
    yeah?
  • orange lozenge wrote on 4 Jun '06, 19:39 report
    How does one become "stuck inside of mobile?"

    What does this mean?
  • boo radley wrote on 4 Jun '06, 20:23 report
    How does one become "stuck inside of mobile?"

    What does this mean?
    I think he means Mobile City in Texas. Check the link and you'll see why he wanted to get out.

  • superphlegm wrote on 4 Jun '06, 20:27 report
    Mr Zimmerman is great.

    The country he comes from... is called the midwest.
  • the ezyrider wrote on 4 Jun '06, 20:32 report
    And it's a Reactions Full House!!!

    Does this mean we'll find Jesus and start making sparse country tinged albums soon?
  • jdt wrote on 4 Jun '06, 22:47 report
    desire is a great album as is the record with "ballad of a thin man" on it.
  • boo radley wrote on 4 Jun '06, 23:02 report
    And it's a Reactions Full House!!!

    Does this mean we'll find Jesus and start making sparse country tinged albums soon?
    Aren't we doing that already? I mean, without the Jesus bit? Who do you reckon is the Reaction most likely to become a born-again Christian? I've got my money on Pies Moller.
  • drayconas wrote on 4 Jun '06, 23:43 report
    Tangled up in Blue. I love that song- if a song is gonna be repetetive, it's gotta be at least that good!!
  • wrote on 5 Jun '06, 08:00 report
    I think the "essential" Dylan albums are (in order of "essentiality":
    1. Blonde on blonde
    2. Highway 61 revisited
    3. Blood on the tracks
    4. Desire
  • the ezyrider wrote on 5 Jun '06, 08:51 report
    I've also got money on Moller to renounce the 24 Hour Food Stop as his place of worship for a nice Baptist Church.
  • adam-carl wrote on 5 Jun '06, 09:16 report
    Usually I find myself annoyed at anything considered 'classic,' by magazines, but Bob is great. Last night I was listening to Blood on the Tracks' which isn't his best, but it's great listened to in the dark.

    I also love this: "i kiss goodbye the howling beast on the borderline that seperated you from me."

    Someone start a Neil Young thread too.
  • chent wrote on 5 Jun '06, 10:45 report
    Bob Dylan wrote some awesome songs. I just wish other people had sung them.
  • vstar wrote on 5 Jun '06, 11:17 report
    I first got into Zimmy when I heard "everything is broken", the first single to a late 80's/early 90s album "No Mercy".

    That album is really good, and 'time out of mind' was pretty decent too. good examples of him still having it together after the early years.


    My fav oldie is "the freewheelin' bob dylan" which has "don't think twice, it's allright" and "talkin world war 3 blues" which is a tune he does with different lyrics a bit.
    The recording(s) is good.


    I watched "masked and anonymous" (film) which stars Jeff Bridges and John Goodman. Kinda strange flick, but he does a lot of songs in that and he is brilliant.


    I watched the first of 2 DVD's, 'no direction home' which was cool, but haven't found time for the 2nd disc yet.
  • peregrin wrote on 5 Jun '06, 11:36 report
    About a year ago I had a similar experience with Nick Cave.
    I always kind of liked his stuff, some songs more than others though...
    Then something just clicked and I kind of understood it more. I did it with Neil Young as well.
    And blondie.
  • chent wrote on 5 Jun '06, 12:11 report
    ..and The Proclaimers
  • jezzaboogie wrote on 5 Jun '06, 12:27 report
    i) The Chili Peppers cover of Subterranean Homesick Blues is well wicked.

    ii) Also I met a man who likes nothing but OPERA, OPERA, OPERA, OPERA ... OPERA, OPERA, OPERA ... and Dylan.

    That is all I have on Bob Dylan.
  • moby dick wrote on 5 Jun '06, 13:01 report
    I actually think the last half of of 'desire' is a bit iffy. The first half is awesome though.
  • hehehehahaha wrote on 5 Jun '06, 13:33 report
    I watched the first of 2 DVD's, 'no direction home' which was cool, but haven't found time for the 2nd disc yet.
    thats an excellent watch. seeing dylan live footage blows me out as well, he's so free and expressive, the songs just kind of drain out of him. or through him, whatever
  • vstar wrote on 5 Jun '06, 14:12 report
    it flipped me out watching that bit with him on piano, and a full backing band. The crowd is heckling him for ditching folk or acoustic guitar or something, and...

    The footage is neat. You can tell it's an old film format.
    There's something cool about it, maybe it just reminds me of old times. I dunno.
  • orange lozenge wrote on 5 Jun '06, 19:43 report
    I've also got money on Moller to renounce the 24 Hour Food Stop as his place of worship for a nice Baptist Church.

    Oh how ye blaspheme!
  • the_new_imorality wrote on 5 Jun '06, 19:51 report
    I think Pies would be more likely to try for a bum-in with the Canterbury bag man.
  • sleepycat wrote on 5 Jun '06, 23:27 report
    I've been a fan since I was about 15. For anyone who really cares about quality lyrics in music the guy is very hard to get away from. People bag his singing a lot but I reckon he's got a great voice for his material and is very underrated as a singer by people who think "ugly voice" and just switch off. (Then again I think Carl McCoy is the greatest singer on earth so you have to take my words with a pinch of NaCl.)

    My favourite four Dylan albums would be (rather predictably) Highway 61 Revisited, Blood on the Tracks, Blonde On Blonde and Bringing It All Back Home. These are in no particular order although I do not listen to the latter quite as much as the others. Not far behind I'd have a couple of great recent efforts, Time Out Of Mind and "Love & Theft". I don't have all of his albums (some are really not worth having) - I've got about half the studio albums as well as all the Bootleg Series issues so far and Biograph.

    There are many artists whose work I like and who I also feel that I would get along with well if I met them. Dylan is not one of those. I suspect that we would hate each other, but that doesn't stop me from appreciating the quality of the guy's art.
  • hehehehahaha wrote on 5 Jun '06, 23:38 report
    his voice, is, like, the best bit!
  • hazelmotes wrote on 6 Jun '06, 00:48 report
    What a coincidence. My mate had a sunday afternoon where we started listening to Hard Rain (the live album) with the ripsnortin' interpretations of his own songs, but you have to skip the odd dud, then we went to Blood on The Tracks, Blonde on Blonde, Highway 61.

    We were really in the mood. So we got Neil Young cranking, but he just couldn't stand up lyrically to that turbo-wordsmith Dylan. And he writes good tunes as well.
  • sleepycat wrote on 26 Aug '06, 19:02 report
    Modern Times is out now and has received a number of rave reviews plus this one from the Guardian which goes pretty close to nailing it IMHO.

    The title of course is a pisstake. There is nothing whatseoever modern about the roots-rock and most of the lyrics could have been written (or more accurately lashed together given how much the guy borrows these days) 50 years ago and would mean exactly the same thing. The song titles are so generic I actually went home to make sure they were originals before buying the thing (in the early 90s he released a couple of albums of blues covers/versions and while they weren't bad I wasn't keen to pay $27 for another one).

    Musically it's very similar (perhaps too similar in some ways) to Time Out Of Mind and "Love & Theft" and generally a bit more low key and samey than either. The songs vary in quality - some are immediately excellent but others are not all that interesting and sound a bit like outtakes from the previous one. Others still take a few listens to make an impression but are well worth it.

    The last track is a magnificent doomy rant that goes for eight minutes 40 seconds, in which time he virtually never shuts up; the title of this effort is "Ain't Talkin'"?
  • vstar wrote on 26 Aug '06, 20:04 report
    I am SO NOT on the ball with Dylan right now.
    I heard about this new release about 2 weeks ago, went online to sus it out and then discovered Love & Theft!

    I will get my hands on them both at some stage.
  • starchild wrote on 26 Aug '06, 21:08 report
    How does one become "stuck inside of mobile?"

    What does this mean?
    I think he means Mobile City in Texas. Check the link and you'll see why he wanted to get out.

    I always read it as a Mobile Home.

    I hatte the loose spiralling Dylan it's shit out of the 40 some odd Dylan albums I've probably got about 20 or just under. The entire Christain period is rubbish as is a lot of what has come since save stuff like You Belong To Me.

    I'm more of a Blood On The Tracks, The Times They are A Changing, John Wesley Harding, Nashville Skyline kind of guy.

    This is made apparent by the fact that I own Self Portrait on vinyl.

    I own a fair few of the 'classic' ones too like Bringin' It All Back Home, Blonde On Blonde and so on but it really shits me how loose he gets. I like my anthems and I like Pat Garrett & Billy The Kid.
  • sleepycat wrote on 27 Aug '06, 13:35 report
    I think he means Mobile City in Texas. Check the link and you'll see why he wanted to get out.


    Try Mobile, Alabama which is a city the size of Hobart and the surrounding area. (For a reason to get out, let's start with: it's in Alabama!) There are a few places called Mobile in the USA.

    I always read it as a Mobile Home.

    Fortunately he sings it mob-eel, which is the way the city name is pronounced.

    I hatte the loose spiralling Dylan it's shit out of the 40 some odd Dylan albums I've probably got about 20 or just under. The entire Christain period is rubbish as is a lot of what has come since save stuff like You Belong To Me.

    I'm more of a Blood On The Tracks, The Times They are A Changing, John Wesley Harding, Nashville Skyline kind of guy.

    This is made apparent by the fact that I own Self Portrait on vinyl.

     

    The diehard Christian phase only lasted two and a half albums and I agree that these are best avoided. I only found out yesterday that John Lennon wrote a pisstake of "Gotta Serve Somebody" called "Serve Yourself"; Lennon goes up in my regard for that. A lot of what Dylan has done since has namechecked the Lawd a bit but he doesn't come across as a strident believer in any particular faith anymore.

    His 80s output would have had a better rep if he'd made better decisions about what to release, and maybe just shut his trap for a few years now and then instead of issuing crap like Down in the Groove. Around 1982-3 he was writing some very good material but he left most of it off Infidels. Some of it was dribbled out in inferior form over the next couple of albums and some of it never surfaced til the Bootleg Series.
  • vstar wrote on 27 Aug '06, 14:57 report
    I still thought he had the faith going.
    Just my impression from reading articles on him from time to time, I still thought he was into it.

    That slow train coming album, I thought the naming the animals track was a classic. But I never got into it as an album.

    It does suprise me that "serve somebody" is still considered as a bit of a classic track, given the unpopularity (maybe I should say "un-coolness") of christianity.
  • kevin wrote on 27 Aug '06, 16:03 report
    Still haven't ever really got him. Saw him live at Kooyong in 1985 or 1986 and I was pretty bored. Mind you, I think that gig must have been a lot better than the one he did at the DEC about 5-6 years later. I saw him in the foyer of the Sheraton Hobart before he went to that gig and he was totally wasted . . .
  • benkl wrote on 27 Aug '06, 16:47 report
    I bought 'Under the Red Sky' and it turned me off Dylan for a good 6 months... Sad story.. But the album is dreadful.
  • sleepycat wrote on 27 Aug '06, 17:41 report
    I still thought he had the faith going.
    Just my impression from reading articles on him from time to time, I still thought he was into it.

    He seems to still believe in some sense but it doesn't come across as fervent fundamentalist/evangelical preachy stuff like it did during the "Christian period".

    It does suprise me that "serve somebody" is still considered as a bit of a classic track, given the unpopularity (maybe I should say "un-coolness") of christianity.

    It's actually quite catchy and modern and radio-friendly by Dylan standards and for its time. Also if you hear the song in isolation it does give the Devil and the Lord an equal go. (I wonder how many people sold their souls to Satan on being presented with the choice between the two?)

    I bought 'Under the Red Sky' and it turned me off Dylan for a good 6 months... Sad story.. But the album is dreadful.

    I've never bought Under The Red Sky though I have heard some songs off it. Nobody much seems to think it's any better than patchy and plenty of people hate it; the one before it (Oh Mercy) is better.

    Still haven't ever really got him. Saw him live at Kooyong in 1985 or 1986 and I was pretty bored. Mind you, I think that gig must have been a lot better than the one he did at the DEC about 5-6 years later. I saw him in the foyer of the Sheraton Hobart before he went to that gig and he was totally wasted . . .

    He stayed totally wasted for about two-thirds of that gig - it was painful and pathetic to behold. Towards the end when he sobered up he was actually rather good but by that stage much of the crowd had left.
  • vstar wrote on 27 Aug '06, 18:24 report
    I still thought he had the faith going.
    Just my impression from reading articles on him from time to time, I still thought he was into it.

    He seems to still believe in some sense but it doesn't come across as fervent fundamentalist/evangelical preachy stuff like it did during the "Christian period".
    fully. and it's more his style/a good style.
    I like him just the way he is. Bugger trying to fit some generic christian mould. that ripped him to pieces.
      
    (I wonder how many people sold their souls to Satan on being presented with the choice between the two?)
    It's a biblical revelation. You're either for God or against God. There's no middle ground.
    If you thought nothing of it, you'd still be in the same boat.

    I bought 'Under the Red Sky' and it turned me off Dylan for a good 6 months... Sad story.. But the album is dreadful.

    I bought this one in the 90's I think.
    I loved the previous album but this one didn't get much of a listen from me. Didn't like it much.
  • kevin wrote on 27 Aug '06, 18:36 report
    Still haven't ever really got him. Saw him live at Kooyong in 1985 or 1986 and I was pretty bored. Mind you, I think that gig must have been a lot better than the one he did at the DEC about 5-6 years later. I saw him in the foyer of the Sheraton Hobart before he went to that gig and he was totally wasted . . .

    He stayed totally wasted for about two-thirds of that gig - it was painful and pathetic to behold. Towards the end when he sobered up he was actually rather good but by that stage much of the crowd had left.
    Yeah - that's what I heard.
    He was sitting in the foyer on a couch with a couple of minders keeping us heathens away from him. He looked totally fucked. This would have been about 7pm or something. There were 4 of us going to dinner, one of the girls went over to get his autograph, but the minders pushed her back (no-one else in the foyer seemed to realise who it was, but he was slouched in a couch with a hoodie pulled over his face). Anyway, cute as she was, she didn't get a sig, I doubt he was capable of signing anything . . . it was quite sad. Even though I don't really like his stuff, ya can't deny his contribution.
  • vstar wrote on 6 Sep '06, 17:10 report
    Just having a listen to the new album.
    I've endured the first 3 tracks which for me is Bluesy rubbish, and 4th track is not doing much for me either.

    Dunno about the lyrics, not listening all that hard.
    It's awful, YUK.
  • vstar wrote on 6 Sep '06, 17:42 report
    well, I could blame my steady diet of grindcore for the past month, but no.
    This album is just dead boring.
    Sorry Zimmy.

    Go another one and stop hanging out in boring 12 bar pubs out the back of nowhere for a while.




    The last track "Ain't Talkin" was the winner.
  • princedirt wrote on 6 Sep '06, 18:51 report
    Desire?
  • sleepycat wrote on 6 Sep '06, 20:05 report
    I agree there is too much dull blues on this album but it only bugs me on three or four tracks, and not all that much generally, though "The Levee's Gonna Break" is such an irritating piece of crap (and with quite bad vocals too) I'm getting inclined to skip it.

    Anyway as much because I detest Bryan Patterson as anything else, I just submitted this to the Sunday Tasmanian:

    Spiritual and religious references do indeed occur here and there on Bob Dylan's new album "Modern Times", as they have almost throughout his career, but syndicated "Soul" columnist Bryan Patterson is jumping to conclusions in reading such lyrics as necessarily Dylan's own thoughts and beliefs. For instance in a song Patterson quotes twice from, "Ain't Talkin'", Dylan also sings "If I catch my opponents ever sleeping, I'll just slaughter 'em where they lie", but nobody would assume from this that Dylan is a potential serial killer, any more than they would assume from his previous album that he is really "in love with second cousin". Often the "I" in Dylan's songs is a fictional character whose views and actions may or may not metaphorically resemble Dylan's own. While not as inscrutable as they used to be, Dylan's recent songs still defy easy interpretation and slotting into trite ideological boxes. Tryhards like Patterson should stay well away from attempting to make sense of them.

    Calling him a tryhard may blow it, but I simply could not bring myself to leave the word "tryhard" out.
  • vstar wrote on 6 Sep '06, 20:28 report
    oh yes, that article on the weekend was a dreadful read.
  • vstar wrote on 7 Sep '06, 09:36 report
    getting back to the album, I was thinking this morning how I shouldn't be so harsh from the blues/12 bar angle. The man has put out lots of great blues/12 bar stuff over his career which I've enjoyed, but this album (from my first listen) lacks pizazz.

    I'll give it another go yet...
  • sleepycat wrote on 16 Sep '06, 21:47 report
    Letter was published minus the words "tryhards like". I've had some feedback to the effect that it's more abruptly contemptuous with that change anyway, which I actually kinda agree with.

    My view on the album hasn't changed much, I still think about half of it is excellent and the other half nothing special or even all that interesting.
  • martin wrote on 16 Sep '06, 22:04 report
    Calling him a tryhard may blow it, but I simply could not bring myself to leave the word "tryhard" out.

    Oh, i fucking enjoy how you do that SLeepy! Keep that beggar on his fucking toes!

    - Got 'Modern Times' shoved into my hands by this genius dj in Sydneys Purple Sneakers night at the Abercrombie. I just havemost genius time every time i am there - it had a bonus DVD which is hopelessly cool, i tell u. And the costumes! Yes, his voice still grates and i fucking hate the long bluesy jams that he comes out with from time to time but the album is still fairly noteworthy.
  • sleepycat wrote on 16 Sep '06, 22:51 report
    Actually I was just thinking early today that his vocal on "Workingman's Blues #2" is great, but not all his vocals on Modern Times are flash. On some tracks his voice sounds thin and seems to go astray in the mix.
  • lion rampant wrote on 24 Sep '06, 20:57 report
    The last track "Ain't Talkin" was the winner.

    It is indeed. It's also a grower, have you found that?
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